NCCOS National Status and Trends Bioeffects Assessment: Chemical contaminant data in the St. Thomas East End Reserves, U.S. Virgin Islands, from 2010-05-04 to 2012-06-22 (NCEI Accession 0146168)

browse graphicPreview graphic
This dataset provides valuable baseline data on sediment chemical contamination for the St. Thomas East End Reserve (STEER), U.S. Virgin Islands (USVI). From 2010-2012, NOAA scientists collected samples as part of a larger, long-term monitoring National Status and Trends Program (NS&T). A broad suite of chemical contaminants were analyzed in sediment, coral (Porites asteroides) and conch (Strombus gigas) samples. These contaminants included polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), chlorinated pesticides including DDT and its metabolites, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), major and trace elements, and butyltins.

Partners in the CRCP project “Characterization of Land-Based Sources of Pollution and Effects in the St. Thomas East End Reserves (STEER)” included the Coastal Oceanographic Assessment, Status and Trends (COAST) Branch, and the Biogeography Branch of NOAA’s National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science (NCCOS), Center for Coastal Monitoring and Assessment (CCMA) in Silver Spring, MD, the USVI Department of Planning and Natural Resources (DPNR), the University of the Virgin Islands (UVI), and The Nature Conservancy (TNC).
  • Cite as: Pait, Tony; Hartwell, Ian; Mason, Andrew; Apeti, Dennis; Bauer, Laurie; Warner, Rob (2016). NCCOS National Status and Trends Bioeffects Assessment: Chemical contaminant data in the St. Thomas East End Reserves, U.S. Virgin Islands, from 2010-05-04 to 2012-06-22 (NCEI Accession 0146168). Version 1.1. NOAA National Centers for Environmental Information. Dataset. doi:10.7289/V5K0729W [access date]
gov.noaa.nodc:0146168
Download Data
  • HTTPS (download)
    Navigate directly to the URL for data access and direct download.
  • FTP (download)
    These data are available through the File Transfer Protocol (FTP). You may use any FTP client to download these data.
Distribution Formats
  • Originator data format
Ordering Instructions Data may be searched and downloaded using online services provided by NCEI using the online resource URLs in this record. Contact NCEI Information Services for custom orders. When requesting data from NCEI, the desired data set may be referred to by the unique package identification number listed in this metadata record.
Distributor DOC/NOAA/NESDIS/NCEI > National Centers for Environmental Information, NESDIS, NOAA, U.S. Department of Commerce
301-713-3277
NCEI.Info@noaa.gov
Dataset Point of Contact Information Services
DOC/NOAA/NESDIS/NCEI > National Centers for Environmental Information, NESDIS, NOAA, U.S. Department of Commerce
301-713-3277
NCEI.Info@noaa.gov
Time Period 2010-05-04 to 2012-06-22
Spatial Bounding Box Coordinates
N: 18.3225
S: 18.30095
E: -64.82621
W: -64.8821
Spatial Coverage Map
General Documentation
Associated Resources
Publication Dates
  • publication: 2016-04-13
Edition 1.1
Data Presentation Form Digital table - digital representation of facts or figures systematically displayed, especially in columns
Dataset Progress Status Complete - production of the data has been completed
Data Update Frequency As needed
Supplemental Information
Submission Package ID: W8CFG1
Purpose The purpose of this effort was to characterize the extent and magnitude of chemical contamination in the St. Thomas East End Reserves or STEER, as part of a larger project to develop an integrated ecosystem assessment for the STEER. The STEER is a collection of marine reserves and wildlife sanctuaries on the southeastern end of the island of St. Thomas, US Virgin Islands. Within the STEER, however, are a variety of land use and maritime activities that are thought to impact the Reserves. Specific objectives of the study were to: 1) Characterize organic chemical contamination in sediments and biota; 2) Characterize inorganic chemical contamination in sediments and biota.
Use Limitations
  • accessLevel: Public
  • Distribution liability: NOAA and NCEI make no warranty, expressed or implied, regarding these data, nor does the fact of distribution constitute such a warranty. NOAA and NCEI cannot assume liability for any damages caused by any errors or omissions in these data. If appropriate, NCEI can only certify that data it distributes are an authentic copy of the records that were accepted for inclusion in the NCEI archives.
Dataset Citation
  • Cite as: Pait, Tony; Hartwell, Ian; Mason, Andrew; Apeti, Dennis; Bauer, Laurie; Warner, Rob (2016). NCCOS National Status and Trends Bioeffects Assessment: Chemical contaminant data in the St. Thomas East End Reserves, U.S. Virgin Islands, from 2010-05-04 to 2012-06-22 (NCEI Accession 0146168). Version 1.1. NOAA National Centers for Environmental Information. Dataset. doi:10.7289/V5K0729W [access date]
Cited Authors
  • Pait, Tony
  • Hartwell, Ian
  • Mason, Andrew
  • Apeti, Dennis
  • Bauer, Laurie
  • Warner, Rob
Principal Investigators
  • Greg Piniak
    US DOC; NOAA; NOS; National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science (NCCOS)
Collaborators
  • USVI Department of Planning and Natural Resources (DPNR)
  • University of the Virgin Islands (UVI)
  • The Nature Conservancy (TNC)
Resource Providers
Points of Contact
  • Oren Perez
    US DOC; NOAA; NOS; National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science (NCCOS)
Publishers
Acknowledgments
  • Funded by: US DOC; NOAA; NOS; National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science (NCCOS)
  • Funded by: US DOC; NOAA; NOS; Coral Reef Conservation Program (Coral Reef Conservation Program - CRCP)
Theme keywords NODC DATA TYPES THESAURUS NODC OBSERVATION TYPES THESAURUS WMO_CategoryCode
  • oceanography
Global Change Master Directory (GCMD) Science and Services Keywords
  • EARTH SCIENCE > BIOLOGICAL CLASSIFICATION > ANIMALS/INVERTEBRATES > ARTHROPODS > CRUSTACEANS > AMPHIPODS
  • EARTH SCIENCE > BIOSPHERE > ECOSYSTEMS > MARINE ECOSYSTEMS > BENTHIC
  • EARTH SCIENCE > OCEANS > MARINE SEDIMENTS
  • EARTH SCIENCE > OCEANS > OCEAN CHEMISTRY
  • EARTH SCIENCE > OCEANS > OCEAN CHEMISTRY > CARBON
  • EARTH SCIENCE > OCEANS > OCEAN CHEMISTRY > ORGANIC CARBON
NCCOS Keywords
  • NCCOS Research Priority > Long-term Monitoring
  • NCCOS Research Priority > Stressors, Impacts, Mitigation, and Restoration (SIMR)
  • NCCOS Research Topic > Bioeffects/Toxicity
  • NCCOS Research Topic > Chemical Contaminants
  • NCCOS Research Topic > Coastal Pollution
  • NCCOS Research Topic > Field Observation
  • NCCOS Research Topic > Monitoring
Originator Keywords
  • 1,2,3,4-Tetrachlorobenzene
  • 1,2,4,5-Tetrachlorobenzene
  • 1,6,7-Trimethylnaphthalene
  • 1-Methylnaphthalene
  • 1-Methylphenanthrene
  • 18a-Oleanane
  • 2,4'-DDD
  • 2,4'-DDE
  • 2,4'-DDT
  • 2,6,10-Trimethyldodecane (i-C15)
  • 2,6,10-Trimethyltridecane (i-C16)
  • 2,6-Dimethylnaphthalene
  • 2-Methylnaphthalene
  • 4,4'-DDD
  • 4,4'-DDE
  • 4,4'-DDT
  • Acenaphthene
  • Acenaphthylene
  • Aldrin
  • Alkanes
  • Alpha-Chlordane
  • Alpha-Hexachlorocyclohexane
  • Aluminum
  • Ampelisca Survival as % of Control
  • Ampelisca Survival – mean
  • Amphipods
  • Anthracene
  • Antimony
  • Arsenic
  • Benthic infauna
  • Benz[a]anthracene
  • Benzo[a]pyrene
  • Benzo[b]fluoranthene
  • Benzo[e]pyrene
  • Benzo[g,h,i]perylene
  • Benzo[k]fluoranthene
  • Benzothiophene
  • Beta-Hexachlorocyclohexane
  • Biphenyl
  • Butyltins
  • C1-Benzothiophene
  • C1-Chrysenes
  • C1-Decalin
  • C1-Dibenzo[a,h]anthracene
  • C1-Dibenzothiophenes
  • C1-Fluoranthenes_Pyrenes
  • C1-Fluorenes
  • C1-Naphthalenes
  • C1-Naphthobenzothiophene
  • C1-Phenanthrenes_Anthracenes
  • C2-Benzothiophene
  • C2-Chrysenes
  • C2-Decalin
  • C2-Dibenzo[a,h]anthracene
  • C2-Dibenzothiophenes
  • C2-Fluoranthenes_Pyrenes
  • C2-Fluorenes
  • C2-Naphthalenes
  • C2-Naphthobenzothiophene
  • C2-Phenanthrenes_Anthracenes
  • C29-Hopane
  • C3-Benzothiophene
  • C3-Chrysenes
  • C3-Decalin
  • C3-Dibenzo[a,h]anthracene
  • C3-Dibenzothiophenes
  • C3-Fluoranthenes_Pyrenes
  • C3-Fluorenes
  • C3-Naphthalenes
  • C3-Naphthobenzothiophene
  • C3-Phenanthrenes_Anthracenes
  • C30-Hopane
  • C4-Benzothiophenes
  • C4-Chrysenes
  • C4-Decalin
  • C4-Dibenzothiophenes
  • C4-Fluoranthenes_Pyrenes
  • C4-Naphthalenes
  • C4-Naphthobenzothiophenes
  • C4-Phenanthrenes_Anthracenes
  • Cadmium
  • Carbazole
  • Carbon Total Content
  • Chlordanes
  • Chlorpyrifos
  • Chromium
  • Chrysene
  • Cis-Nonachlor
  • Cis_Trans Decalin
  • Clay - Chemistry Sample
  • Clostridium perfringens - Count 1
  • Clostridium perfringens - Count 2
  • Clostridium perfringens – Mean
  • Clostridium perfringens – dry
  • Clostridium perfringens – wet
  • Copper
  • DDMU
  • DDTs
  • Decalin
  • Delta-Hexachlorocyclohexane
  • Density
  • Dibenzo[a,h]anthracene
  • Dibenzofuran
  • Dibenzothiophene
  • Dibutyltin
  • Dieldrin
  • Dieldrins
  • Diversity
  • Endosulfan I
  • Endosulfan II
  • Endosulfan Sulfate
  • Endosulfans
  • Endrin
  • Evenness
  • Fluoranthene
  • Fluorene
  • Gamma-Chlordane
  • Gamma-Hexachlorocyclohexane
  • Grain size
  • Gravel - Chemistry Sample
  • Heptachlor
  • Heptachlor-Epoxide
  • Hexachlorobenzene
  • Indeno[1,2,3-c,d]pyrene
  • Individuals – total
  • Iron
  • Lead
  • Manganese
  • Mercury
  • Mirex
  • Monobutyltin
  • Naphthalene
  • Naphthobenzothiophene
  • Nickel
  • Norpristane
  • Organochlorines
  • Oxychlordane
  • PAHs
  • PCB101_90
  • PCB105
  • PCB110_77
  • PCB118
  • PCB128
  • PCB138_160
  • PCB146
  • PCB149_123
  • PCB151
  • PCB153_132_168
  • PCB156_171_202
  • PCB158
  • PCB170_190
  • PCB174
  • PCB18
  • PCB180
  • PCB183
  • PCB187
  • PCB194
  • PCB195_208
  • PCB199
  • PCB201_173_157
  • PCB206
  • PCB209
  • PCB28
  • PCB29
  • PCB31
  • PCB44
  • PCB45
  • PCB49
  • PCB52
  • PCB56_60
  • PCB66
  • PCB70
  • PCB74_61
  • PCB87_115
  • PCB8_5
  • PCB95
  • PCB99
  • PCBs
  • Pentachloroanisole
  • Pentachlorobenzene
  • Percent lipid dry weight
  • Percent lipid wet weight
  • Perylene
  • Phenanthrene
  • Phytane [i-C20]
  • Pristane [i-C19]
  • Pyrene
  • Sample Composition
  • Sample dry weight
  • Sample percent dry weight
  • Sample percent wet weight
  • Sample wet weight
  • Sand - Chemistry Sample
  • Selenium
  • Sewage Markers
  • Silicon
  • Silt - Chemistry Sample
  • Silver
  • Taxa – Total
  • Tetrabutyltin
  • Tin
  • Total Inorganic Carbon
  • Total Organic Carbon
  • Trans-Nonachlor
  • Tributyltin
  • Zinc
  • n-Decane
  • n-Docosane
  • n-Dodecane
  • n-Dotriacontane
  • n-Eicosane
  • n-Heneicosane
  • n-Hentriacontane
  • n-Heptacosane
  • n-Heptadecane
  • n-Heptatriacontane
  • n-Hexacosane
  • n-Hexadecane
  • n-Hexatriacontane
  • n-Nonacosane
  • n-Nonadecane
  • n-Nonane
  • n-Nonatriacontane
  • n-Octacosane
  • n-Octadecane
  • n-Octatriacontane
  • n-Pentacosane
  • n-Pentadecane
  • n-Pentatriacontane
  • n-Tetracontane
  • n-Tetracosane
  • n-Tetradecane
  • n-Tetratriacontane
  • n-Triacontane
  • n-Tricosane
  • n-Tridecane
  • n-Tritriacontane
  • n-Undecane
Data Center keywords Global Change Master Directory (GCMD) Data Center Keywords
  • DOC/NOAA/NESDIS/NODC > National Oceanographic Data Center, NESDIS, NOAA, U.S. Department of Commerce
  • DOC/NOAA/NESDIS/NCEI > National Centers for Environmental Information, NESDIS, NOAA, U.S. Department of Commerce
  • DOC/NOAA/NOS/NCCOS > National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science, National Ocean Service, NOAA, U.S. Department of Commerce
NODC SUBMITTING INSTITUTION NAMES THESAURUS
Instrument keywords NODC INSTRUMENT TYPES THESAURUS Global Change Master Directory (GCMD) Instrument Keywords
  • GAS CHROMATOGRAPHS
  • SEDIMENT CORERS
Place keywords NODC SEA AREA NAMES THESAURUS Global Change Master Directory (GCMD) Location Keywords
  • OCEAN > ATLANTIC OCEAN > NORTH ATLANTIC OCEAN > CARIBBEAN SEA
NCCOS DISCOVERY KEYWORDS THESAURUS
  • NCCOS Research Location > Geographic Area > Coastal Ocean
  • NCCOS Research Location > Geographic Area > Coral Reefs
  • NCCOS Research Location > Marine Protected Area > St. Thomas East End Reserves (STEER)
  • NCCOS Research Location > Region > U.S. Caribbean
  • NCCOS Research Location > U.S. States & Territories > U.S. Virgin Islands
Project keywords NODC PROJECT NAMES THESAURUS Global Change Master Directory (GCMD) Project Keywords
  • NS&T > National Status and Trends Program
Keywords NCEI ACCESSION NUMBER
Use Constraints
  • Cite as: Pait, Tony; Hartwell, Ian; Mason, Andrew; Apeti, Dennis; Bauer, Laurie; Warner, Rob (2016). NCCOS National Status and Trends Bioeffects Assessment: Chemical contaminant data in the St. Thomas East End Reserves, U.S. Virgin Islands, from 2010-05-04 to 2012-06-22 (NCEI Accession 0146168). Version 1.1. NOAA National Centers for Environmental Information. Dataset. doi:10.7289/V5K0729W [access date]
  • NOAA requests that all individuals who download NOAA data acknowledge the source of these data in any reports, papers, or presentations. If you publish these data, please include a statement similar to: Some or all of the data described in this article were produced by the NOAA's National Ocean Service through its National Status and Trends Program (NS&T).
Access Constraints
  • NOAA and NCEI cannot provide any warranty as to the accuracy, reliability, or completeness of furnished data. Users assume responsibility to determine the usability of these data. The user is responsible for the results of any application of this data for other than its intended purpose.
Fees
  • Digital data may be downloaded from NCEI at no charge in most cases. For custom orders of digital data or to obtain a copy of analog materials, please contact NCEI Information Services for information about current fees.
Lineage information for: dataset
Processing Steps
  • 2016-04-13T17:29:11 - NCEI Accession 0146168 v1.1 was published.
Output Datasets
Lineage information for: dataset
Processing Steps
  • Data Type: Chemical Contaminants (measured); Units: varied; Observation Type: laboratory analysis; Sampling Instrument: ponar grab; Sampling and Analyzing Method: Sampling Method: Sample collection followed established protocols for the National Status and Trends (Lauenstein and Cantillo, 1998; Apeti et al., 2012). The sediments and tissue samples for chemical contaminant analysis were collected using standard NOAA National Status and Trends (NSandT) Program protocols (Lauenstein and Cantillo, 1998; Apeti et al., 2012 Update). A PONAR grab was deployed to collect the sediment samples using a pulley and davit, and retrieved by hand. Rocks and bits of seagrass were removed. If a particular grab did not result in 200-300 g of sediment, a second grab was made and composited with material from the first. If enough sediment had not been collected after three deployments of the grab, the site was abandoned and the boat moved on to an alternate site. Using this strategy, a total of 24 sediment samples were collected. A series of protocols were used to avoid contamination of the sediment samples by equipment and cross contamination between samples and sites. All equipment was rinsed with acetone and then distilled water just prior to use at a site. Personnel handling the samples also wore disposable nitrile gloves. The top 3 cm of sediment were collected from the grab using a stainless steel sediment scoop. This top layer of sediment is referred to as surficial sediment, and is typically indicative of recent deposition. Sediments were placed into two certified clean (I-Chem) 250 ml labeled jars, one for organic chemical analysis, the other for metal analysis, capped and then placed on ice in a cooler. Sediments for grain size analysis were placed in a WhirlPack bag, sealed and placed on ice in a cooler. At the end of each day, sediment samples for contaminant analysis were placed in a freezer; the WhirlPack bags for the grain size analysis were placed in a refrigerator rather than frozen, to avoid altering the grain size structure of the sediment. Coral and conch tissue samples were collected based on the standard operation procedure described in Apeti et al, 2012. For conch sampling, two methods of collection were used. 1) Boat based onboard a Nature Conservancy vessel sampling via SCUBA or snorkeling, and 2) Kayak based sampling via snorkeling only. A total of 10 conch specimens were collected from 5 separate locations, one within each strata. At each location two organisms were collected by hand and placed in labeled 2 gallon Ziplock bags. The bags containing the specimens were placed in a cooler of ice. At the end of the field mission, conch specimens were partially thawed and their soft tissues were removed from their shells, weighed, and then placed into labeled 1 liter Teflon jars and refrozen. Once completely frozen, the samples were shipped with dry-ice to the analytical laboratory. At the lab. the two soft tissues were composited into a single tissue sample for each location before contaminant analysis. The coral that was collected for this study was Porites astreoides (Lamarck 1816) common name mustard hill coral. This species was chosen because it is abundant and not endangered. The coral samples were collected by SCUBA diving using hammer and titanium or stainless steel coring punch. A sample location was defined as a single dive area with about 50 meter radius where enough Porites astreoides colonies (heads) were available for multiple sampling. Samples of P. astreoides were collected from five sites. Unlike the conch tissues, which only one set per location was collected for contaminant analyses, the coral tissues were collected in two sets, one for contaminant analyses and the other for histopathology measurements. At each location coral cores were collected from 5 different coral colonies (heads) to constitute a site-composite. Using hammer the titanium coring punch was driven into the coral colonies to extract coral cores of approximately 1.5 cm in diameter and 1-1.5 cm. Pieces of fractured coral cores were dislodged with Teflon stir stick and used as sample taking care to avoiding removal of large amounts of skeletal material. The cores of coral tissue were placed inside pre-labeled 250 ml IChem jars and then capped underwater. The jars were brought to the surface, drained of water and placed on ice. The samples were then preserved by freezing at -15 degree C until they were shipped overnight on dry-ice to the analytical laboratory. Analyzing Method: Sediment and tissue samples were analyzed for trace elements and organic contaminants. All samples were analyzed by TDI-Brooks in College Station, TX following proven methods. TDI-Brooks International, Inc who has been performing the analyses since 2000 uses a modified version of EPA methods. Samples were prepared for inductively coupled plasma/mass spectrometry analysis (ICP-MS) for major metals (copper, cadmium, chromium, lead, manganese, nickel, antimony, and zinc) while atomic fluorescence spectrometry was utilized to measure arsenic and selenium and atomic absorption spectrometry was used for mercury analysis. For all metals, but Hg, sediment and tissue samples were digested by sequentially adding nitric acid and hydrogen peroxide to Teflon bombs to achieve sample dissolution in oven. For analysis of Hg, samples were digested based on a modified version of EPA method 245.5, using a concentrated H2SO4 and HNO3 digestion, followed by addition of KMnO4, and K2S2O8, and the samples were again digested. For organic contaminants including butyltins, PAHs, PCBs, PBDEs and organochlorine-pesticides, sediment and tisse samples were first extracted. Homogenized samples were chemically dried with Hydromatix(TM). Tissue/Hydromatix(TM) mixtures were then extracted with 100% dichloromethane using accelerated solvent extraction (ASE) method. The extracts were then concentrated to 3 ml by evaporative solvent reduction. Silica gel/alumina column chromatography was utilized to concentrate and purify the samples before analysis. Quantitation of PAHs and their alkylated homologues was performed by gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC/MS) in the selected ion monitoring (SIM) mode. Chlorinated hydrocarbons (chlorinated pesticides and PCBs) were quantitatively determined by capillary gas chromatography with an electron capture detector (ECD). Detailed extraction and analytical methods used by the MWP are available in Kimbrough and Lauenstein (2006). Quality control samples were processed with each batch of samples in a manner identical to the samples, including matrix spikes, method blank, duplicates and standard reference materials (SRMs). In total, approximately 5% of all analyses were QC analyses. Processing quality was considered acceptable if the following criteria were met: blanks were less than three times the minimum detection limit; accuracy, as determined by analysis of certified reference materials, was within 30% and precision, as determined by replicate analyses, was within 30% for organic analytes.; Data Quality Information: Data Quality Method: The measurement quality objectives of the National Status and Trends specify accuracy and precision requirements of 30% for organic analytes and 15% for inorganic analytes in tissue samples. The analytical instruments were calibrated by standard laboratory procedures. In total, approximately 5% of all analyses were QC analyses. QA procedures include running blanks, spiked samples, and standard reference materials with each batch of samples. Processing quality was considered acceptable if the following criteria were met: blanks were less than three times the minimum detection limit; accuracy, as determined by analysis of reference materials, was within 30% for organic analytes and within 20% for inorganic analytes; and precision, as determined by replicate analyses, was within 30% for organic analytes and within 20% for inorganic analytes. Any batch failing to meet the specifications is reanalyzed or rejected. The QA Criteria may be found in NOAAs Tech Memo NOS NCCOS 30 and 29. The standard NSandT analytical protocols are described in Kimbrough et al. (2006a and 2006b).
Acquisition Information (collection)
Instrument
  • chromatograph
  • laboratory analysis
  • mass spectrometer
  • sediment sampler - corer
  • sediment sampler - grab
Last Modified: 2018-03-08T01:44:15
For questions about the information on this page, please email: NODC.DataOfficer@noaa.gov