Calcification rates of crustose coralline algae (CCA) derived from Calcification Accretion Units (CAUs) deployed at coral reef sites in Batangas, Philippines in 2012 and recovered in 2015 (NCEI Accession 0162831)

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Laboratory experiments reveal calcification rates of crustose coralline algae (CCA) are strongly correlated to seawater aragonite saturation state. Predictions of reduced coral calcification rates, due to ocean acidification, suggest that coral reef communities will undergo ecological phase shifts as calcifying organisms are negatively impacted by changing seawater chemistry. Calcification accretion units, or CAUs, are used by the NOAA Coral Reef Ecosystem Program (CREP) to assess the current effects of changes in seawater carbonate chemistry on calcification and accretion rates of calcareous and fleshy algae.

CAUs, constructed in-house by CREP, are composed of two 10 x 10 cm flat, square, gray PVC plates, stacked 1 cm apart, and are attached to the benthos by SCUBA divers using stainless steel threaded rods. Deployed on the seafloor for a period of time, calcareous organisms, primarily crustose coralline algae and encrusting corals, recruit to these plates and accrete/calcify carbonate skeletons over time. By measuring the change in weight of the CAUs, the reef carbonate accretion rate can be calculated for that time period.

The calcification rate data described here were collected by CREP from CAUs moored at fixed climate survey sites located on hard bottom shallow water (< 15 m) habitats in the Philippines, in accordance with protocols developed by Price et al. (2012). Climate sites were established by CREP to assess multiple features of the coral reef environment (in addition to the data described herein) from March 2012 to June 2015, and five CAUs were deployed at each survey site.

In conjunction with benthic community composition data (archived separately), these data serve as a baseline for detecting changes associated with changing seawater chemistry due to ocean acidification within coral reef environments.
  • Cite as: Coral Reef Ecosystem Program; Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (2017). Calcification rates of crustose coralline algae (CCA) derived from Calcification Accretion Units (CAUs) deployed at coral reef sites in Batangas, Philippines in 2012 and recovered in 2015 (NCEI Accession 0162831). Version 1.1. NOAA National Centers for Environmental Information. Dataset. [access date]
gov.noaa.nodc:0162831
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Distributor DOC/NOAA/NESDIS/NCEI > National Centers for Environmental Information, NESDIS, NOAA, U.S. Department of Commerce
301-713-3277
NCEI.Info@noaa.gov
Dataset Point of Contact Information Services
DOC/NOAA/NESDIS/NCEI > National Centers for Environmental Information, NESDIS, NOAA, U.S. Department of Commerce
301-713-3277
NCEI.Info@noaa.gov
Time Period 2012-03-13 to 2015-06-03
Spatial Bounding Box Coordinates
N: 13.7281
S: 13.6586
E: 120.895
W: 120.872
Spatial Coverage Map
General Documentation
Associated Resources
Publication Dates
  • publication: 2017-07-15
Edition 1.1
Data Presentation Form Digital table - digital representation of facts or figures systematically displayed, especially in columns
Dataset Progress Status Complete - production of the data has been completed
Data Update Frequency As needed
Supplemental Information
Submission Package ID: JF944Y
Purpose The Coral Reef Ecosystem Program (CREP) at NOAA Fisheries is conducting in-situ climate monitoring across the U.S. Pacific Islands Region. Climate monitoring provides a comprehensive view of climate change impacts on coral reef ecosystems and helps identify areas of resilience and vulnerability. The key indicators used to identify and monitor climate-driven trends include 1) thermal stress caused by changes in sea temperature, 2) ocean acidification resulting from changes in carbonate chemistry, and 3) ecological impacts by collecting data on coral growth rates and community structure to understand the impacts of thermal stress and ocean acidification on the ecosystem. This particular dataset for the Philippines is part of a 3-year project ("Climate, Biodiversity and Fisheries in the Coral Triangle: Embracing the E in Ecosystem Approaches to Fisheries Management") implemented by CREP. This project was funded by NOAA's Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) and the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) Regional Development Mission Asia (RDMA) as part of the U.S. Coral Triangle Initiative, with additional support from the Coral Triangle Support Partnership and USAID Philippines. The goal of the project was to build on CREP's expertise to provide tools and information about climate change, ocean acidification, and their impacts on biodiversity and fisheries that could inform and be incorporated into an Ecosystem Approach to Fisheries Management (EAFM) for the Philippines. CREP worked with local governments, communities, and NGOs to build science capacity by establishing robust observing capabilities and providing hands-on training to initiate collection of climate science information for the Verde Island Passage in the Philippines that can be used toward adaptive EAFM.
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  • accessLevel: Public
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Dataset Citation
  • Cite as: Coral Reef Ecosystem Program; Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (2017). Calcification rates of crustose coralline algae (CCA) derived from Calcification Accretion Units (CAUs) deployed at coral reef sites in Batangas, Philippines in 2012 and recovered in 2015 (NCEI Accession 0162831). Version 1.1. NOAA National Centers for Environmental Information. Dataset. [access date]
Cited Authors
Principal Investigators
Contributors
Resource Providers
Points of Contact
Publishers
Acknowledgments
  • Related Funding Agency: US DOC; NOAA; NOS; Coral Reef Conservation Program
  • Related Funding Agency: US DOS; United States Agency for International Development (USAID - USAID)
  • Related Funding Agency: US DOS; United States Agency for International Development
Theme keywords NODC DATA TYPES THESAURUS NODC OBSERVATION TYPES THESAURUS WMO_CategoryCode
  • oceanography
CoRIS Discovery Thesaurus
  • Numeric Data Sets > Calcification Rate
CoRIS Theme Thesaurus
  • EARTH SCIENCE > Biosphere > Aquatic Habitat > Reef Habitat
  • EARTH SCIENCE > Biosphere > Vegetation > Algae > Algal Cover
  • EARTH SCIENCE > Biosphere > Vegetation > Algae > Algal Growth > Calcification Rate
  • EARTH SCIENCE > Biosphere > Vegetation > Algae > Calcareous Macroalgae
  • EARTH SCIENCE > Biosphere > Vegetation > Algae > Crustose Coralline Algae
  • EARTH SCIENCE > Biosphere > Vegetation > Algae > Encrusting Macroalgae
  • EARTH SCIENCE > Biosphere > Vegetation > Algae > Fleshy Macroalgae
  • EARTH SCIENCE > Biosphere > Vegetation > Algae > Reef Monitoring and Assessment
  • EARTH SCIENCE > Biosphere > Vegetation > Algae > Reef Monitoring and Assessment > Calcification Accretion Unit (CAU)
  • EARTH SCIENCE > Biosphere > Zoology > Corals > Reef Monitoring and Assessment
  • EARTH SCIENCE > Biosphere > Zoology > Corals > Reef Monitoring and Assessment > Baseline studies
  • EARTH SCIENCE > Biosphere > Zoology > Corals > Reef Monitoring and Assessment > In Situ Biological
  • EARTH SCIENCE > Oceans > Coastal Processes > Coral Reefs
  • EARTH SCIENCE > Oceans > Ocean Chemistry > Calcification
  • EARTH SCIENCE > Oceans > Ocean Chemistry > Carbonate Chemistry
  • EARTH SCIENCE > Oceans > Ocean Chemistry > Ocean Acidification
Global Change Master Directory (GCMD) Science and Services Keywords
  • EARTH SCIENCE > BIOLOGICAL CLASSIFICATION
Submitter Provided Keywords
  • Ocean Acidification
  • USAID
  • United States Agency for International Development
Data Center keywords Global Change Master Directory (GCMD) Data Center Keywords
  • DOC/NOAA/NESDIS/NODC > National Oceanographic Data Center, NESDIS, NOAA, U.S. Department of Commerce
  • DOC/NOAA/NESDIS/NCEI > National Centers for Environmental Information, NESDIS, NOAA, U.S. Department of Commerce
  • DOC/NOAA/NMFS > National Marine Fisheries Service, NOAA, U.S. Department of Commerce
NODC COLLECTING INSTITUTION NAMES THESAURUS NODC SUBMITTING INSTITUTION NAMES THESAURUS Contributing Data Centers
  • CRED
  • CREP
  • Coral Reef Ecosystem Division
  • Coral Reef Ecosystem Program
  • PIFSC
  • Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center
Instrument keywords NODC INSTRUMENT TYPES THESAURUS Submitter Provided Instrument Keywords
  • Calcification Plate
  • Settling Plate
Place keywords NODC SEA AREA NAMES THESAURUS CoRIS Place Thesaurus
  • COUNTRY/TERRITORY > Philippines > Batangas > Arthur's Rock (13N120E0002)
  • COUNTRY/TERRITORY > Philippines > Batangas > Mabini (13N120E0032)
  • COUNTRY/TERRITORY > Philippines > Batangas > Tingloy (13N120E0009)
  • COUNTRY/TERRITORY > Philippines > Batangas > Twin Rocks Sanctuary (13N120E0005)
  • OCEAN BASIN > Pacific Ocean > South China Sea > Balayan Bay > Arthur's Rock (13N120E0002)
  • OCEAN BASIN > Pacific Ocean > South China Sea > Balayan Bay > Mabini (13N120E0032)
  • OCEAN BASIN > Pacific Ocean > South China Sea > Balayan Bay > Twin Rocks Sanctuary (13N120E0005)
  • OCEAN BASIN > Pacific Ocean > South China Sea > Maricaban Island > Tingloy (13N120E0009)
Global Change Master Directory (GCMD) Location Keywords
  • OCEAN > PACIFIC OCEAN > NORTH PACIFIC OCEAN
Submitter Provided Place Keywords
  • Arthur's Reef
  • Batalang Bato
  • Batong Buhay
  • Koala Reserve Area
  • Philippines
  • Twin Rocks
  • Verde Island Passage
Project keywords NODC PROJECT NAMES THESAURUS CRCP Project
  • 483
  • Climate, Biodiversity and Fisheries in the Coral Triangle: Embracing the E in Ecosystem Approaches to Fisheries Management
Keywords NCEI ACCESSION NUMBER
Use Constraints
  • Cite as: Coral Reef Ecosystem Program; Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (2017). Calcification rates of crustose coralline algae (CCA) derived from Calcification Accretion Units (CAUs) deployed at coral reef sites in Batangas, Philippines in 2012 and recovered in 2015 (NCEI Accession 0162831). Version 1.1. NOAA National Centers for Environmental Information. Dataset. [access date]
Access Constraints
  • NOAA and NCEI cannot provide any warranty as to the accuracy, reliability, or completeness of furnished data. Users assume responsibility to determine the usability of these data. The user is responsible for the results of any application of this data for other than its intended purpose.
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Lineage information for: dataset
Processing Steps
  • 2017-07-15T00:52:19 - NCEI Accession 0162831 v1.1 was published.
Output Datasets
Lineage information for: dataset
Processing Steps
  • Data Type: CALCIFICATION (measured); Units: gram/centimeter; Observation Type: laboratory analysis; Sampling Instrument: calcification accretion unit.
Acquisition Information (collection)
Instrument
  • laboratory analysis
Last Modified: 2018-05-08T02:34:01
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